View Cart

 Animals-and-Wildlife | Beaches | Contact Us | East of Jersey | Feedback | Flora and Fauna |  Greetings Cards | Home | Jersey Cows | Landmarks | Landscapes | Links | North of Jersey | North-West of Jersey | North-East of Jersey | Pictore Poetry |  Reservoirs | Seascapes and Beaches | South-West of Jersey | South of Jersey | South-East of Jersey | Sunsets | Surfing | Terms | Testimonials | Web Site Design | West of Jersey


Designed and Maintained by www.jerseydelightswebsites.com

Jersey Delights Photography for unusual photographs taken around the lovely island of Jersey Marilyn and Michael photographers, founders of Jersey Delights Photography and Meadow Maidens

A pleasant surprise is to discover the photograph you will never forget....

Contact Us

Click on a location to enter the gallery of photographs

South East

Green Island

La Rocque

Le Hocq

St Clement

St Saviour

St. Saviour

St. Saviour is the only one to be virtually landlocked, having only a small piece of access to the sea at Le Dicq and it borders five other parishes.  It is considered as an extension to town but also has lots of lush greenery.


St. Clement

St Clement contains the long beaches and rocky coastlines that make up Green Island and La Hocq.  Many an hour can be spent on low tide walking through this rocky moonlike terrain and as the evening draws in you can see the sunsets which are amazing from these beaches.


Green Island is a small island off the coast of St. Clement. It is situated near the sea shore and is accessible at low tide but visitors to the Island need to be careful not to be cut off by the incoming tide. The island has a grassy surface and is predominantly clay surrounded by rocks. In recent times efforts have been made to preserve the Island by the construction of walls.  The beach is very popular with tourists and the small crop of rocks on the beach are well explored and loved by children.


Le Hocq

Le Hocq is a headland where there is a round tower which was built as a fortification against the French in the 17th/18th century.  It is uninhabited, apart from some birds who tend to flock in and around it. The rest of the beach, stretching east, is sandy, but with many rockpools. Just below Le Hocq Tower, west of the groyne of boulders, is a more pleasant sandy beach, which stretches round the headland to a very stony stretch of beach which reaches as far as Rocqueberg -Witches' Rock and Green Island.


La Rocque

La Rocque is great for sunbathing at low tide, great for swimming at high tide, with protection from the westerly winds.  It is one of the best localities from which to view waders and seabirds as well as visible migration during spring and autumn.